making healthy eating fun

Pumpkins: Color Me Orange


 

2 COLORING PAGES: PRETTY PUMPKINS & A JACK-O-LANTERN

PumpkinsColor Page 12-PumpkinsColoring isn’t just for kids anymore. For the last couple of years, coloring books for adults have literally kept the book business alive. There’s something about coloring that soothes the soul. Some avid “color-istas” even host coloring parties, no kids allowed!

Taking time to color a pretty picture is great for those of us whose lives are hurried and harried and who need to slow down. (And I’m afraid that describes a whole lot of adults these days–me included.) But coloring with your kids has additional benefits: it creates connections. It lets your kids know that they’re important to you, and that time spent together is as much fun for you as it is for them.

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Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater


 

10 FUN FACTS ABOUT PUMPKINS

kids on pumpkinsLike summer squash, the winter squashes–among them pumpkins–are identified by botanists as a fruit and by cooks as a vegetable. Technically, pumpkins are fruit–fleshy vessels that hold the seeds of the plant.

For our purposes, though–since we’re focused more on food than science here (not that they aren’t very closely related!)–and because in their raw state, pumpkins are more savory than sweet, we’re calling them veggies.

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Summer Squash vs. Winter Squash


 

A QUICK QUIZ ABOUT COUSINS: SUMMER & WINTER SQUASH

Summer SquashDo your kids know the ways that summer squash and winter squash are different? It’s not as easy as it sounds!

Here’s a fun quiz to see how well they (and you!) know your way around squash. The answers contain explanations and additional information.

QUESTIONS

1. Which picture shows summer squash and which shows winter squash?

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A Fruit Dessert that Kids Will Love


 

PEAR-PEACH-PINEAPPLE PUDDIN’: A KID-FRIENDLY RECIPE

Pear Pudding RecipeLate summer-early fall is a perfect time to find tree-ripened fruit at your local farmers market–should you be so lucky–or at your grocery store. This delicious, nutrient-rich dessert recipe, adapted from The Mayo Clinic Kids’ Cookbook (one of my favorite resources for family cooking), uses fresh pears, peaches, bananas, blueberries and grapes and canned pineapple. It’s simple enough that your child can put it together almost on his own.

Plus, it’s a great way to help your family get the recommended five servings of fruits and veggies a day, too!

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A Book that Begins in an Orchard…


 

AND ENDS WITH GOOD FRIENDS SHARING FRUIT PIE.

fruit pieNow that’s farm-to-table!

Some books just stay with you. Each Peach Pear Plum, aimed at the very young, first debuted in 1978, 25 years after I was the right age to have it read to me. But when I discovered it as a university student studying early childhood education, it became an instant favorite and has remained at the top of my list of classic picture books. If it isn’t already, it just may become a favorite for you and your children too.

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